NARUC 61In the photo (l to r): Superintendent Dr. Dave Goldtooth and the Mayor of Farmington, Nate Duckett, were part of a panel discussion with industry figures in Washington, D.C., where they shared the needs of the communities in the four corners, and how those needs will be impacted by the closure of energy plants in both community and education.

Board of Education Vice President, Suzette Jean Haskie, and Superintendent Dr. Dave Goldtooth met with the commissioners of the Subcommittee on Clean Coal and Carbon Management on February 10, 2020, during the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners’ Winter Policy Summit in Washington, D.C.

The Mayor of Farmington, Nate Duckett, and Dr. Goldtooth were part of a panel discussion with industry figures, where they shared the needs of the communities in the four corners, and how those needs will be impacted by the closure of energy plants in both community and education.

NARUC 26“Just like you support your families, our families in the four corners and their livelihoods depend on the plants staying open. The closure of the plants will have a tremendous impact on our communities and our students,” said Dr. Goldtooth to the commissioners.

“Our school district simply does not have the tax base to make up for the loss of property tax revenue. We would have to make cuts to our educational programs and we would lose students if the plants close. Our lives would change dramatically,” he added.

After the panel ended, Jeremy Oden, Alabama PSC, and John McCaffrey, Senior Regulatory Counsel at the American Public Power Association, showed great interest in finding more information about the events that Mayor Duckett and Superintendent Goldtooth brought to their attention.

The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) is a non-profit organization dedicated to representing the state public service commissions who regulate the utilities that provide essential services such as energy, telecommunications, power, water, and transportation.

NJOMA 8

NJOMA Conference

Superintendent Dr. Dave Goldtooth, Board of Education Vice President, Suzette Jean Haskie, Indian Education Committee members and CCSD staff attended the annual National Johnson O’Malley Association Conference (NJOMA) that took place in Arlington, Virginia, from February 9-11, 2020.

On Tuesday, February 11, the team presented a video titled “We are Central Schools” to the rest of the conference, sharing information with other school districts about the common challenges CCSD and other districts have. The discussion included a brief conversation about the unique challenges CCSD faces, from the closure of energy plants, the impact of those potential closures, and the percentage of Impact Aid funds that CCSD has received from the state of New Mexico in more than two decades.

Federal Impact Aid is designed to assist school districts that have lost property tax revenue due to the presence of tax-exempt Federal property, or that have experienced increased expenditures due to the enrollment of federally connected children, including children living on Indian lands.

“This was a great team effort, from discussing what our central message at the conference will be; to preparing a detailed message to the legislators we would meet while in D.C. Our communities should know that we came to D.C. to deliver a message that represented them,” said Dr. Goldtooth.

“We have discovered that current legislation in Santa Fe has connections with the work taking place at the federal level. We spent time in D.C. to make sure that the legislators have a local face and a voice in mind when they make decisions about our future. Our conversations were well-received and it is our sincere hope that we brought the message home”, he said.

The National Johnson-O'Malley Association is a nonprofit organization that supports programs and the rights of Indian children from 3 years old through twelfth grade.

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U.S. Energy Association

The Mayor of Farmington, Nate Duckett, and Superintendent Dr. Dave Goldtooth, held a presentation on the afternoon of Tuesday, February 11, at United States Energy Association (USEA).

The detailed presentation centered on current efforts to keep the San Juan Generating Station open and installing a carbon capture process. The presentation comprised a discussion of the impact of the plants closure in numbers, the loss of more than 50 million in tax revenue to the City of Farmington, more than 100 million in salaries, and 80 percent of the property tax revenue to Central Schools.

Carbon capture and storage is the process of capturing waste carbon dioxide, transporting it to a storage site, and depositing it where it will not enter the atmosphere, normally an underground geological formation.

USEA, U.S. Member Committee of the World Energy Council, is an association of public and private energy-related organizations, corporations, and government agencies.

Team with Legislators 13In the photo (l to r): Superintendent Dr. Dave Goldtooth and Alanna Purdy, Legislative Assistant for U.S. Congressman Ben Ray Luján.

First District, Third District of New Mexico

The team was also busy visiting the offices of U.S. Congressman Ben Ray Luján (Third District, New Mexico), and U.S. Congresswoman Debra Haaland (First District, New Mexico), to touch on the same issues discussed at the NJOMA conference and energy panels.

The visit included CCSD Board of Education Vice President, Suzette Jean Haskie, and Gallup-McKinley Board of Education member Priscilla Manuelito.

The team’s work in D.C. started with a recent meeting with the Office of New Mexico Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham.

Team with Legislators 59

In the photo (l to r): Superintendent Dr. Dave Goldtooth and Heidi Todacheene, Legislative Counsel for U.S. Congresswoman Debra Haaland.

Team in Santa Fe

In the photo (l to r): Gary Montoya, Board of Education President, Suzette Jean Haskie, Board of Education Vice President, John Bingaman, Chief of Staff for Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, and Dr. Dave Goldtooth, Superintendent of Central Schools.